Media and Communication Studies: Network Society Studies

Summary

Network Society Studies is a student-led literature based course where the flipped classroom approach will be applied. This means that students will be given texts to read before class and online or in class seminars will be used to put the readings in the context, to discuss their relevance and applicability in understanding the times we live in. The discussions will be led by three experts in the field, who will all suggest readings close to their heart and interests. At the same time, the students will be given a choice, which seminars they will want to engage in more deeply and which classes they prefer to watch later and not engage in the discussions.

Admission requirements

30 credits on advanced level in Media- and Communication Studies, Communication for Development or other Social Science discipline + English B.

Selection:

credits 100%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2020, autumn 2019, autumn 2018

Course Code:
KK648A revision 2
Level of specialisation
A1F
Main fields of study:
No main fields
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
29 May 2018
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
03 September 2018
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
18 October 2015

Entry requirements

30 credits on advanced level in Media- and Communication Studies, Communication for Development or other Social Science discipline + English B.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course can be part of the degree requirements for a master's degrees.

Purpose

The purpose of this course is to present students with different theoretical perspectives and concepts for studying networks, networking and the network society from the perspective of media and communication studies. The course offers student the possibility to deepen their understanding of the role of ICTs in society and societal development and to critically discuss the strengths and limitations of various approaches to network society studies.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After completing this course, students shall
1) have an in-depth understanding of different perspectives on networks, networking and the network society from the perspective of media and communication studies;
2) demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the role of ICTs in contemporary societies and processes of social change.

Competence and skills
After completing this course, students shall
3) demonstrate the ability to formulate a research problem relevant to the theme of the course
4) demonstrate skills in theoretical and conceptual comparisons
5) demonstrate the analytical skills necessary for conducting an empirical study.

Judgement and approach
After completing this course, students shall be able to
6) critically assess assumptions related to theories of the network society
7) consider and apply research ethics to an empirical study on a topic relevant to the course content.

Learning activities

Learning activities consist of independent readings, lectures, seminars that take place on campus and online, and of written assignments based on empirical studies.

Assessments

Students are assessed through 1) written seminar assignments and peer-feedback (learning outcomes 1, 2 and 6) (7,5 ECTS), and 2) an exam-paper based on a small-scale empirical study conducted either individually or in pairs (learning outcomes 3, 4, 5 and 7) (7,5 ECTS)

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Castells, M. (2004) Informationalism, Networks, and the Network Society: A Theoretical Blueprint, Avaliable on: http://annenberg.usc.edu/sites/default/files/2015/04/28/Informationalism,%20Networks%20and%20the%20Network%20Society.pdf)

Castells, M. (2007). Communication, Power and Counter-power in the Network Society. International Journal of Communication, 1, 238-266.

van Dijck, J. (2013) The culture of connectivity: A critical history of social media. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Townsend L. and Wallace, C. (2016) Social Media Research: A Guide to Ethics. Available at: http://www.dotrural.ac.uk/socialmediaresearchethics.pdf

Each term approximately 200 pages of additional readings connected to the interchangeable thematic strands are added. Further, students should independently identify and apply additional readings (of approximately 50 pages) relevant to the specific topic addressed in their individual exam paper.

Course evaluation

Written course evaluation carried out at the end of the course.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Further information

MCS Malmö University,
E-mail: mcs@mau.se

Application

12 November 2018 - 20 January 2019 100% Distance (Malmö) Application code: mau-82441

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 21000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 21000 SEK

Open for late application

Apply

02 September 2019 - 10 November 2019 100% Distance (Malmö) This course is offered as part of a program

09 November 2020 - 17 January 2021 100% Distance (Malmö) This course is offered as part of a program