Conflicts and development in Global Politics

Summary

Admission requirements

at least 20 credits from International Relations I, or in some other relevant field in the social sciences.

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2019, spring 2018, spring 2017

Course Code:
IR150L revision 1.2
Level of specialisation
G1F
Main fields of study:
No main fields
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
16 November 2016
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
16 January 2017
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
02 March 2016

Entry requirements

at least 20 credits from International Relations I, or in some other relevant field in the social sciences.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course is not part of a main field of study.

Purpose

The aim of the course is that students will independently develop a deepened understanding and knowledge of, and ability to study, the current conflicts and development of global politics. The theoretical focus of the course is on structures and actors in global/regional conflicts, development and global political economy.

Contents

  • Module 1: Understanding/Explaining International Conflicts (10 hp)
  • Module 2: Structures and Agency in Global Political Economy (10 hp)
  • Module 3: Project (10 hp)
  • The first module, Understanding/Explaining International Conflicts, provides a deepened study of contemporary theorizing on global politics with a particular focus on global and/or regional conflict. Issues include war, terrorism, religion, and non-Western approaches to International Relations. The second module, Structures and Agency in Global Political Economy, provides a deepened study of contemporary theorizing on global political economy with a particular focus on structures and agencies. The third module, the Project, is intended to be a self-study and group work module with tutor-led seminars on project work presentations. Students are also required to produce an individual research report on a particular actor relevant to global politics. The students’ choice of actor must be approved by the lecturer responsible at the start of the semester. The module lets the student practice his/her ability to relate theorizing with good practices of research, including competing philosophies of social science and methodological approaches. Where possible, so as to help enhance students’ understanding of data and methods, projects will be supported via collaboration with both external partners and existing research projects being conducted within the department.

Learning outcomes

After completing module 1 (Understanding/Explaining International Conflicts) the student shall be able to:
(1) Critically discuss, explain and analyse distinct theories of global conflict in terms of actors, issues, and levels of analysis.
(2) Argue for different scientific conceptualisations, explanations and interpretations of conflicts in global politics.
After completing module 2 (Structures and Agencies in Global Political Economy), the student shall be able to:
(3) Critically discuss, explain and analyse distinct theories of global political economy in terms of actors, issues, and levels of analysis.
(4) Argue for different scientific conceptualisations, explanations and interpretations of global political economy.

After completing module 3 (Project), the student shall be able to:
(5) Identify and argue for the choice of a relevant actor in global politics.
(6) Describe and critically analyse this actor in relation to a key problem, area or process in global politics related to module 1 and/or 2, and make a project presentation.
(7) Critically discuss and evaluate competing philosophies of social science and methodological approaches.

Learning activities

Teaching takes place in lectures, seminars, and project work in groups. In addition to their attendance students are expected to spend substantial time studying the course literature and in preparation of work for assessment.

Assessments

The student’s performance in module 1 (Understanding/Explaining International Conflicts) is assessed as follows:
Intended Learning Outcomes 1 and 2 are assessed through an individual course paper and an individual oral exam.
The student’s performance in module 2 (Structures and Agency in Global Political Economy) is assessed as follows:
Intended Learning Outcomes 1 and 2 are assessed through an individual course paper and an individual oral exam.
The student’s performance in module 3 (Project) is assessed as follows:
Intended learning outcome 3 is assessed through a portfolio including an individual written assignment and group project presentations (such as paper, poster, oral presentation, etc.).

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Understanding/Explaining International Conflicts (10 hp)
  • Angstrom, Jan, and J.J. Widen. 2015. Contemporary Military Theory: The Dynamics of War. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Sandal, Nukhet, and Jonathan Fox. 2013. Religion in International Relations Theory. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Shilliam, Robbie (ed.). 2011. International Relations and Non-Western Thought. Imperialism, Colonialism and Investigations of Global Modernity. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Wight, Colin. 2015. Rethinking Terrorism: Terrorism, Violence and the State. London: Palgrave.
Selected articles and other material (c. 250 pages).

Structures and Agency in Global Political Economy (10 hp)
  • Broome, André. 2014. Issues and Actors in the Global Political Economy. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Kingsbury, Damien et al. (eds.). 2016. International Development; Issues and Challenges. 3rd edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave
  • O’Brien, Robert, and Marc Williams. 2016. Global Political Economy: Evolution and Dynamics. 5th edition. London: Palgrave.
Selected articles and other material (c. 250 pages).

Project (10 hp)
  • Roselle, Laura and Sharon Spray (2011) Research and Writing in International Relations (Second edition) London: Pearson.
Articles and other material (c. 500-1000 pages), selected in consultation with teacher.

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

If a course is no longer offered or has undergone major changes, students will be offered two re-take sessions based on the syllabus in force at registration during a period of one year from the date of the implementation of the changes.

Other Information

The Language of Instruction is English

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Ingrid Alexandersson, Student Administrator
Phone: 040-6657331
Johan Modée, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657586

Application

21 January 2019 - 09 June 2019 Day-time 100% Malmö This course is offered as part of a program